Young Michurinites! Skillfully fulfill the maxims of the great transformer of nature!

Poster Number: PP 877
Category: Youth
Poster Notes: The statue is of Ivan Vladimirovich Michurin (1855-1935) a pioneer Russian botanist of scientific agricultural selection and agricultural genetics.
Media Size: Please inquire
Poster Type: Lithograph and Offset
Publishing Date: 1955
Editorial Information: Editor V. Lapshin; Artistic Editor Iu. Britman
Technical Information on Poster: Submitted September 10, 1955; Publication No. 0245; 1 large sheet; Order No. 660; Price 1 ruble
Glavlit Directory Number: Sh-06545
Catalog Notes: PP 877 Youth
Artist: Berezovskii, Boris Feoktistovich — Березовский, Борис Феоктистович

Boris Berezovskii never received formal artistic education. From 1923 to 1924, he studied under the tutelage of Nikolai Grigoriev in Moscow. In 1949, he began to exhibit his works publicly. Throughout his artistic career, he produced designs for postage stamps as well as posters. The State Museum of Contemporary Russian History in Moscow holds a number of his posters in their collection.

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Printer: Leningrad Offset Printing Plant — Ленинградское Офсетная типография

The Leningrad Offset Printing Plant was located near Kronverkskaia and Mir Streets in Leningrad (St. Petersburg). Historically, the printer had roots in Imperial Russia as a large operation founded in 1881 by Theodore Kibbel (Fedor Fyodorovich Kibbel') until it was nationalized by the Soviets in 1917. After its initial nationalization, the printer's management (via a series of government-controlled printing trusts) and its name both changed over the decades until it ultimately became the Leningrad Offset Printing Plant in the spring of 1950.

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Publisher: IzoGiz (State Publishing House of Fine Art), Moscow — Изогиз (Государственное издательство изобразительного искусства), Москва

The history of IzoGiz begins with the formation of Ogiz, the Association of the State Book and Magazine Publishers. In 1930, the Sovnarkom of the Russian Socialist Federative Soviet Republic established Ogiz to centralize publishing under a monopoly in order to eliminate duplication of printed material, to streamline and control publishing production and its output, and to create a base for marketing books, training and technical manuals. In 1931, the Central Committee of the USSR ordered certain publications be separated from Ogiz. The separation principally affected technical manuals and propaganda material issued by the publisher. For example, posters, art magazines and artistic books were placed under Izogiz (Izobrazitel'noe iskusstvo), the fine arts section of Ogiz. In 1963, Izogiz was merged with the publishing house, "Soviet Artist" (Sovetskii khudozhnik).

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