Be as was the Great Lenin. Electors; the people should require from their deputies that they do their tasks to the utmost, that in their work they do not lower themselves to the level of the political peon, that they remain at their posts as political activists of the Leninist type. [Partial translation]

Poster Number: PP 976
Category: Lenin
Poster Notes: The text on this poster comes from a December 1937 speech by Josef Stalin. In the speech he declared, "...people, must demand that their deputies should remain equal to their tasks,... that as public figures they should be as clear and definite as Lenin was, that they should be as fearless in battle and as merciless towards the enemies of the people as Lenin was...".
Media Size: 39x29.5
Poster Type: Lithograph and Offset
Publishing Date: 1938
Editorial Information: Editor Druzhkov, A.; Text editor Strukov, E.
Technical Information on Poster: Approved for publication December 28, 1937; Approved for printing January 8, 1938; IzoGiz No. 9309; Order No. 3285; Standard format 60x94 - Volume 1 sheet of paper; Price 70 kopeks
Glavlit Directory Number: B-85442
Sources & Citation: Pisch, A. (2016). The personality cult of Stalin in Soviet posters, 1929-1953: Archetypes, inventions and fabrications. Canberra: ANU Press.
Catalog Notes: PP 976 Lenin
Artist: Elkin, Vasilii Nikolaevich — Елкин, Василий Николаевич
Printer: Gudok Typography Workshop, Moscow — Типография Гудок, Москва

Gudok is the Russian word for whistle and this was also the name given to the railway industry newspaper in the Soviet Union. The printer was located in Moscow at 7 Stankevich Street.

Read More...
Publisher: Ogiz-IzoGiz, Moscow-Leningrad — Огиз-Изогиз, Москва-Ленинград

Ogiz was the Association of the State Book and Magazine Publishers. Its main offices were located in Moscow and in Leningrad. The Sovnarkom of the Russian Socialist Federative Soviet Republic established Ogiz in 1930 to centralize publishing activities under a state monopoly in order to eliminate duplication of printed material, streamline and control publishing production and output, and to create a base for marketing books, training and technical manuals. In 1931, the Central Committee of the USSR ordered certain publications be separated from Ogiz. This principally affected technical manuals and propaganda material issued by the publisher. For example, posters, art magazines and artistic books were placed under Izogiz (Izobrazitel'noe iskusstvo), the fine arts section of Ogiz. In 1949, Ogiz was reorganized and merged into Glavpoligrafizdat, the Main Administration for Matters of the Polygraphic Industry, Publishing and Book Selling. In 1953, Glavpoligrafizdat was reorganized and renamed, Glavizdat. Thereafter, the publishing, printing and bookselling monopoly in the USSR was separated into three distinct divisions. In 1963, Izogiz was merged with the publishing house, "Soviet Artist" (Sovetskii khudozhnik).

Read More...