The literate will teach the illiterate. To the Five-Year Plan of socialist construction, we are adding a three-year plan to liquidate illiteracy.

Poster Number: PP 979
Poster Notes: [On paper held by red figure] We should undertake a simple vital task – the mobilization of the literate for the struggle against illiteracy. This poster propagates Likbez (likvidatsiia bezgramotnosti) a campaign to "liquidate illiteracy" in the U.S.S.R. The program began in 1919 when Vladimir Lenin signed the decree "On eradication of illiteracy among the population of RSFSR". All Soviet citizens aged 8 to 50 years were required to be literate in their native language.
Media Size: 45.5x31
Poster Type: Lithograph
Publishing Date: 1930
Technical Information on Poster: As taken from the original [art work] of Terpsikhorov; Price 40 kopeks.
Glavlit Directory Number: A-49977
Catalog Notes: PP 979 Education & Literacy
Artist: Terpsikhorov, Nikolai Borisovich — Терпсихоров, Николай Борисович
Printer: State Lithography Workshop named for M. Tomskii, Leningrad — Государственная литография им. М. Томского, Ленинград

The State Lithography Workshop named for M. Tomskii was located at Kronverkskaia and Mir Streets in Leningrad (Petrograd). The workshop was named in honor of Mikhail Pavlovich Tomskii (1880-1936), head of the Soviet trade union and the head of the State Publishing House. Historically, the large printing operation was founded in 1881 by Theodore Kibbel (Fedor Fyodorovich Kibbel). Shortly after the printer was nationalized by the Soviets, it became the 1st State Lithography Workshop, and in 1924 it was named in honor of Tomskii. Thereafter, it underwent a variety of name changes while being controlled by state-run printing trusts.

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Publisher: A.Kh.R. (Association of Artists of the Revolution) — А.Х.Р (Ассоциация Художников Революции)

The Association of Artists of the Revolution was an artist cooperative from 1928 to 1932. From 1922-1928 it was called the Association of Artists of Revolutionary Russia. During the 1920s, the Association rose to prominence in the Soviet art world. It opened branches throughout the USSR, and it operated its own publishing house in Moscow at 25 Tsvetnoi Boulevard. The Association was abolished in 1932 when the government centralized a majority of independent arts organizations in the USSR.

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