New land laws of the Soviets in Ukraine. [First panel] The land of the ruling class verses the land of the farmers. That is how it was during the time of the wealthy and capitalists. [Second panel] How it is under Soviet rule: All land to the farmers, long live Soviet rule!

Poster Number: PP 023
Media Size: 33x23
Poster Type: Lithograph
Publishing Date: 1920
Sources & Citation: Ukrainsʹke radiansʹke obrazotvorche mystetstvo ta arkhitektura: Mystetstvo narodzhene zhovtnem, 1917-1987. (1987). Kyïv: Mystetstvo.
Catalog Notes: PP 023 Communist Culture
Artist: Efimov (Fridliand), Boris Efimovich — Ефимов (Фридлянд), Борис Ефимович

Boris Efimov (born Boris Efimovich Fridliand) revealed his creative industry at a young age, when in 1916, he produced a handmade school newspaper featuring his original drawings placed with the writings of his brother (and journalist to be) Mikhail Koltsov. Following a family move to Kharkov, Boris returned to Kiev in 1917 to study at the National Economic Institute and also to study under the law faculty at Kiev State University though he finished neither program. He published his first professional cartoons in the magazine Zritel' [Viewer] in 1918, a year before he was appointed secretary of the People's Commissariat of Military Affairs of the Ukrainian Soviet Socialist Republic. In 1920, he moved to Odessa to serve as head of the Department of Visual Agitation for UgROSTA (Southern Department of the Russian Telegraph Agency). Soon after, his cartoons appeared in such newspapers as BolshevikKommunar  [Commune Resident], and Visti [News]. Upon moving to Moscow in 1922, he began contributing to the newspapers Izvestiia [News], Pravda [Truth] and Trud [Labor], as well as the satirical magazines Chudak [Oddball] and Krokodil [Crocodile]. 

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Publisher: State Publishing House, Kiev — Государственное издательство, Киев

The State Publishing House had its origins in Imperial Russia as the Royal Print Yard in St. Petersburg. As the Red Army controlled more provinces and cities in former Imperial Russia, the State Publishing House developed offices outside St. Petersburg. Kiev was a major city of Imperial Russia as well as of the USSR. Once Soviet control was established in Ukraine, publishing was concentrated in the State Publishing House that existed from 1919-1930. Today, Kiev is the capital of the Ukrainian Republic.

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