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Poster Number: PP 1205
Category: Agriculture
Media Size: 39x27
Poster Type: Lithograph and Offset
Publishing Date: 1931
Editorial Information: Editor Babeva
Technical Information on Poster: IzoGiz No. 2161 R.31 No 356. Price 50 kopeks. "Send your comments about this poster to: Moscow, IZOGIZ, Mass Agitation Sector".
Glavlit Directory Number: B-7575
Catalog Notes: PP 1205 Agriculture b
Artist: Moor (Orlov), Dmitrii Stakhievich — Моор (Орлов), Дмитрий Стахиевич

Dmitrii Stakhievich Moor (birth surname Orlov) was born into the family of a mining engineer and did not receive formal artistic education. After moving to Moscow in 1898, and between 1902 and 1906, he actively participated in the city’s revolutionary movement, specifically taking part in the failed 1905 Revolution. While working at the Anatolii Mamontov printing shop, he submitted his drawings to periodicals. In 1908, he began to publish his cartoons in satirical journals, namely in Budil'nik [Alarm Clock]. While designing for Budil'nik, he adopted the pseudonym Moor deriving this name of the protagonist in Friedrich Schiller's play The Robbers (1781). During the early 1900s, Moor’s characteristic graphic style emerged. It was defined by a preference for black and white ink drawing, often punctuated with color accents. In 1910, Moor attended the studio of Petr Ivanovich Kelin, a Russian visual artist, but he never finished his studies. After the October Revolution of 1917, Moor worked as a graphic designer for such satirical magazines as Bezbozhnik u stanka [Atheist at the Workbench] (1923-1928), Krokodil [Crocodile] (from 1922), and at Daesh’ [Give] while creating caricatures for the leading Soviet newspaper Pravda. In 1918, he designed decorations for Moscow’s Red Square May Day festivities. Between 1919 and 1920, he produced posters for the Revvoensovet [Revolutionary Military Council]. Moor was famous for his revolutionary posters. His stark-looking poster Pomogi! [Help!] (1920) became a canonical image representing the plight of the starving Russian population during the Russian Civil War. From 1922 to 1930, Moor taught at VKhUTEMAS [Higher Art and Technical Studios] and from 1930 to 1932, he taught at the Moscow Polygraphic Institute. He joined the artistic association October in 1928, staying its member until the group disbanded in 1932. That year, he was awarded the title of Honored Worker of Arts of the Russian Soviet Federated Socialist Republic. From 1932 to 1941, Moor worked at Izogiz State Publishing House. During World War II, he was evacuated to Samarkand, Uzbekistan where he continued to produce posters, drawings, and illustrations for the war effort.

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Printer: Izvetsia (News) All-Union Central Executive Committee Typography Offset Print Shop —

The Izvestia (News) All-Union Central Executive Committee Typography Offset Print Shop was located in Moscow and it printed the Izvestia newspaper. Both Izvestia and Pravda (Truth) were the leading newspapers in the Soviet Union. One Soviet-era joke said, "there is no news in Pravda and no truth in Izvestia".

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Publisher: Ogiz-IzoGiz, Moscow-Leningrad — Огиз-Изогиз, Москва-Ленинград

Ogiz (Ob"edinenie gosudarstvennykh knizhno-zhurnal'nykh izdatel'stv) is the Association of the State Book and Magazine Publishers. It was established in 1930 by the RSFSR Sovnarkom to centralize all publishing activities in the Soviet Union. Aside from centralization, Ogiz helped eliminate duplication of printed products. Posters, art magazines and artistic books were placed under the Izogiz (Izobrazitel'noe iskusstvo) fine arts section of Ogiz. In 1963, Izogiz was re-named Sovetskii khudozhnik, "Soviet Artist".

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