"In Leningrad there is no gap between the front line and the back line. All live with one thought, with one spirit – to do everything for the annihilation of the enemy." – A. Zhdanov.

Poster Number: PP 368
Category: World War II
Poster Notes: Quote comes from Andrei Zhdanov, Chairman of the RSFSR Supreme Soviet from 1938 to 1947. His likeness is illustrated on the right side of the poster. Written on flag: "Long live the 25th Anniversary of the Great October Socialist Revolution!" The spire in the background is the Admiralty Building of Leningrad [St. Petersburg].
Media Size: 39x30
Poster Type: Offset
Publishing Date: 1942
Technical Information on Poster: No. 2326; M Order No. 49; Price 2 rubles...50 kopeks
Glavlit Directory Number: [Illegible]..10560
Catalog Notes: PP 368 World War II b
Artist: Gordon, Mikhail Abramovich — Гордон, Михаил Абрамович

Gordon, Mikhail Abramovich
Гордон, Михайл Абрамович
Born Petrograd (St. Petersburg), September 29, 1918; Died St. Petersburg, January 3, 2003

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Artist: Efimov (Fridliand), Boris Efimovich — Ефимов (Фридлянд), Борис Ефимович

Boris Efimov (born Boris Efimovich Fridliand) revealed his creative industry at a young age, when in 1916, he produced a handmade school newspaper featuring his original drawings placed with the writings of his brother (and journalist to be) Mikhail Koltsov. Following a family move to Kharkov, Boris returned to Kiev in 1917 to study at the National Economic Institute and also to study under the law faculty at Kiev State University though he finished neither program. He published his first professional cartoons in the magazine Zritel' [Viewer] in 1918, a year before he was appointed secretary of the People's Commissariat of Military Affairs of the Ukrainian Soviet Socialist Republic. In 1920, he moved to Odessa to serve as head of the Department of Visual Agitation for UgROSTA (Southern Department of the Russian Telegraph Agency). Soon after, his cartoons appeared in such newspapers as BolshevikKommunar  [Commune Resident], and Visti [News]. Upon moving to Moscow in 1922, he began contributing to the newspapers Izvestiia [News], Pravda [Truth] and Trud [Labor], as well as the satirical magazines Chudak [Oddball] and Krokodil [Crocodile]. 

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Printer: Detgiz (Children's State Book Printing) —

The Detgiz publishing and printing plant in Moscow was located at 49 Sushchevskii Rampart. While it focused on children's books, occasionally it printed political posters. Detgiz was founded in 1933 with the aid of Maxim Gorky, famed Russian author. His participation attracted literary talent, resulting in Soviet writers, artists and educators being dully employed by Detgiz. There were many departments within Detgiz such as fiction, science fiction, classical literature and preschool reading. The firm was also affiliated with the Moscow-based "House of Children's Books", a store where writers performed live readings of their books for children.

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Publisher: Iskusstvo (Art Publishing House), Moscow-Leningrad — Искусство, Москва-Ленинград

Iskusstvo was the Art Publishing House (A.K.A. Visual Arts Publishing) that was created in 1936 from Ogiz-Izogiz (State Art and Literature Publishing House). It disseminated books and journals dealing with graphic design and the fine arts, and it issued numerous posters. Since the Iskusstvo banner was part of the State Printing Works in Leningrad (St. Petersburg) and Moscow, its two main offices were located in those two cities.

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