¡Viva la jornada de la cosecha y la colectivización – día festivo del nuevo campo socialista! “El cultivo de la tierra colectivizada es el primer paso hacia una agricultura socialista, un golpe seguro para los explotadores de los campesinos. ¡El primer haz [de trigo] se utilizará para la industrialización de la URSS!”

Número de Cartel: PP 138
Tamaño: 46.5x31
Tipo de cartel: Lithograph
Fecha de publicación: c.1930
Información técnica: From the original of the artist Khristoforov S. A., Price 60 kopeks.
Número de Glavlit: A 46548
Información en el catálogo: PP 138 Agriculture
Artista: Khristoforov, Sergei Alexandrovich — Христофоров, Сергей Алехангрович
Imprenta: Mospoligraf (Moscow Polygraphic), Moscow — Мосполиграф, Москва

Mospoligraf was a state-owned printing trust located in Moscow. When the Soviet Union formulated a plan in 1921 to consolidate the nation’s largest and best printing operators into state-owned trusts; Mospoligraf was organized in 1922 to carry out consolidation of the Moscow printing industry. With a staff of over two thousand, Mospoligraf was the second-largest printing trust organized in Moscow outside of the Mospechat’ trust, and it oversaw a myriad of houses under local printing sections such as the 2nd Chromolithography Workshop, the 5th Lithography Workshop, the 7th Typography Workshop and the 26th Lithography Workshop, to name a few. After a reorganization, the trust leased its operators. For example, two printers under Mospoligraf- the 1st Exemplary Print Shop and the 20th Print Shop (Krasnii Proletarii)-- were both leased to Gosizdat publishing. Throughout the history of the USSR, government trusts led the printing industry in terms of ownership, but efforts to consolidate the industry (as a whole) remained disjointed.

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Editorial: A.Kh.R. (Association of Artists of the Revolution) — А.Х.Р (Ассоциация Художников Революции)

The Association of Artists of the Revolution was an artist cooperative from 1928 to 1932. From 1922-1928 it was called the Association of Artists of Revolutionary Russia. During the 1920s, the Association rose to prominence in the Soviet art world. It opened branches throughout the USSR, and it operated its own publishing house in Moscow at 25 Tsvetnoi Boulevard. The Association was abolished in 1932 when the government centralized a majority of independent arts organizations in the USSR.

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