¡El capitán de la tierra de los soviéticos nos lleva de victoria en victoria!

Número de Cartel: PP 397
Categoría: Stalin
Tamaño: 41.5х28.5
Tipo de cartel: Lithograph and Offset
Fecha de publicación: 1933
Información en el catálogo: PP 397 Stalin b
Artista: Efimov (Fridliand), Boris Efimovich — Ефимов (Фридлянд), Борис Ефимович

Boris Efimov (born Boris Efimovich Fridliand) revealed his creative industry at a young age, when in 1916, he produced a handmade school newspaper featuring his original drawings placed with the writings of his brother (and journalist to be) Mikhail Koltsov. Following a family move to Kharkov, Boris returned to Kiev in 1917 to study at the National Economic Institute and also to study under the law faculty at Kiev State University though he finished neither program. He published his first professional cartoons in the magazine Zritel' [Viewer] in 1918, a year before he was appointed secretary of the People's Commissariat of Military Affairs of the Ukrainian Soviet Socialist Republic. In 1920, he moved to Odessa to serve as head of the Department of Visual Agitation for UgROSTA (Southern Department of the Russian Telegraph Agency). Soon after, his cartoons appeared in such newspapers as BolshevikKommunar  [Commune Resident], and Visti [News]. Upon moving to Moscow in 1922, he began contributing to the newspapers Izvestiia [News], Pravda [Truth] and Trud [Labor], as well as the satirical magazines Chudak [Oddball] and Krokodil [Crocodile]. 

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Imprenta: Gudok Typography Workshop, Moscow — Типография Гудок, Москва

Gudok is the Russian word for whistle and this was also the name given to the railway industry newspaper in the Soviet Union. The printer was located in Moscow at 7 Stankevich Street.

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Editorial: Ogiz-IzoGiz, Moscow-Leningrad — Огиз-Изогиз, Москва-Ленинград

Ogiz was the Association of the State Book and Magazine Publishers. Its main offices were located in Moscow and in Leningrad. The Sovnarkom of the Russian Socialist Federative Soviet Republic established Ogiz in 1930 to centralize publishing activities under a state monopoly in order to eliminate duplication of printed material, streamline and control publishing production and output, and to create a base for marketing books, training and technical manuals. In 1931, the Central Committee of the USSR ordered certain publications be separated from Ogiz. This principally affected technical manuals and propaganda material issued by the publisher. For example, posters, art magazines and artistic books were placed under Izogiz (Izobrazitel'noe iskusstvo), the fine arts section of Ogiz. In 1949, Ogiz was reorganized and merged into Glavpoligrafizdat, the Main Administration for Matters of the Polygraphic Industry, Publishing and Book Selling. In 1953, Glavpoligrafizdat was reorganized and renamed, Glavizdat. Thereafter, the publishing, printing and bookselling monopoly in the USSR was separated into three distinct divisions. In 1963, Izogiz was merged with the publishing house, "Soviet Artist" (Sovetskii khudozhnik).

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