Komsomolskaia Pravda da inicio a los cursos por correspondencia sobre el estudio teorético de las cuestiones fundamentales del marxismo-leninismo. Todo el curso por correspondencia tendrá una duración de 6 meses y tratará las cuestiones fundamentales del marxismo-leninismo. [Traducción parcial]

Número de Cartel: PP 1080
Información sobre el cartel: "Komsomol’skaia Pravda" began publishing its paper in March 1925.
Tamaño: 22.5x15.5
Tipo de cartel: Lithograph
Fecha de publicación: 1930
Número de Glavlit: 63247. Mosoblit, Moscow regional section of Glavlit
Información en el catálogo: PP 1080 Education & Literacy
Artista: Artist Unknown — неизвестный художник

The artist's name on the poster is not indicated. By assigning Artist Unknown to a poster it also could mean the artist used a chop mark whereby no signature is seen thus rendering the artist's identity anonymous.

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Imprenta: Mospoligraf (Moscow Polygraphic) 15th Lithography Workshop, Moscow (formerly Mashistov) — 15-я Литография «Мосполиграф», Москва (бывш. Машистова)

The Mospoligraf 15th Lithography Workshop was located at 23 Bol'shaia Sadovaia Street in Moscow. Its history begins with Ivan Mikhailovich Mashistov (1851-1914) the founder and managing director of Mashistov Typolithography. His firm printed magazines, historical books, and during the First World War, it printed and published patriotic posters. Under the Soviets, Mashistov Lithography became the 15th Lithographic Workshop and, it was also known as the MGSNKh (Moscow City Council of National Economy) Typo-lithography Workshop. In 1922 the Soviet Union consolidated the nation’s largest and best printing operations into state-owned trusts. The Mospoligraf Trust consolidated the Moscow printing industry and it was the second-largest Moscow printing trust outside of Mospechat’. Both trusts secured a myriad of local printing houses. The 15th Lithography Workshop was managed by Mospoligraf.

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Editorial: Pravda (Truth) — Правда

Pravda began publication in May 1912 as the newspaper of the Communist Party of Russia. The newspaper circulated until June 1913 when it was re-circulated under a variety of names until July 1914. Following the October Revolution of 1917, Pravda became the leading and most influential daily newspaper in the Soviet Union. Its main offices were at 9 Tverskaia Street in Moscow; a building that has since been demolished. Pravda continues to be published in the 21st century.

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